Up, up and away!

I’m off again after being home for just over a day.  I’m looking forward to the warmth of the Midwest region of Carnarvon, our agricultural region, mostly fruit and vegetables.  Probably too early for mangoes at the moment, but one can only hope!

DSCN8303.jpgThis is the main street.  Yes, that’s it folks!  Finding a parking spot is always a cinch!DSCN9385I remember seeing this male zebra finch in the scrub while driving 80 km/hr.  My ability to see birds in unexpected places, still amazes me!  But like I’ve said before, if you look for it, you find it.DSCN8169.jpgThe skies here are awesome.  During a storm or …DSCN8315.jpgon a clear day, as Barbra sang, “you can see forever”.DSCN8345I found this outside the public toilets at Pelican Point, a favourite place for locals to do a bit of kite surfing.  It always makes me smile!

I have so many enjoyable memories of places I visit that I’m always happy to visit again.  My hobby of photography has taught me, enjoy and keep what brings joy … which brings me to my goal next month.

My goal is to wean myself off headlines about ‘world leaders’.  I no longer want to scratch my head and wonder how and why.  The exasperation this brings, I can live without.

As a child I remember we heard the news twice a day on what was then Radio Ceylon; the BBC World Service.  You could hear a pin drop during the news as my parents would insist on this.  Then we got the newspaper from the city.  It was still news when it arrived a day later.  I watched an elderly man in Esperance recently who was walking home from the corner shop, with a newspaper rolled up under his arm.  A rare sight I thought.  The habit of clicking news headlines is now in our fingertips, it would seem.  How quickly times have changed.

I want a simpler life.  Am I returning to where I started from?  If I am, that’s okay with me, because I came from a happy place, where I keep my memories.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

 

 

 

Batten down!

 

 

I tried to leave home before the storm hit.  The weather bureau predicted it was severe and one of two such storms in a given year.  The message was simple.  “Batten down!”  For once, the prediction was correct.  The rain, a deluge, forced me off the road and forced me to seek shelter at a petrol station off the highway, as did the 100 km/hour high winds.  I got to Bunbury just before it got too dark.

DSCN8407.jpgThis sunset at Back Beach in Bunbury, did, however, salvage the day for me.  It was cold.  It was wild.  It was magnificent.DSCN8353.jpgThe storm passed over night.  The next day I went to Big Swamp after work.  There seemed to be more swamp hens than I’ve ever seen before.  I love them!  Usually shy, this one was bold and sounded a raucous warning of my presence.DSCN8366.jpgThe path to the water is decked with winter colours.DSCN8359.jpgThe purple pea flower was prolific winding over shrubs and trees.DSCN8371.jpgI’m not sure what this plant is called but it is unusual.  Flowers grow on stalks that are on both sides of the leaf.

I returned home with the knowledge, it is spring next month.  Until then, one can only hope, rain means more wildflowers this year.  My work will be taking me to them.  I can’t wait!

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

 

What is balance?

Early Sunday morning, coffee in hand, I listened to the rain in the dark.  Although winter has some special moments, I couldn’t help but smile to see it was getting lighter, earlier.  Spring is on the way.

On a recent trip to Esperance it was cold, too cold, to do much else other than stay indoors and warm.  I decided to do what I did years ago and went into the cyclical pattern of work, back to hotel to write reports, work again.  One and a half days of this and I was exhausted.  Something was missing in my life.  I went for a massage after work at the end of the second day.  The young Chinese girl worked hard at my poor “too tight muscles”.

The next morning the sun shone for a short while.  I dressed and went to Esperance Bay to catch daybreak.  Half an hour outdoors, and I was myself again.

DSCN8300.jpgI watched the sun rise beyond my favourite seat on the Bay.  DSCN8288.jpgAs day broke, I noticed the few days of storm surge had muddied the Bay, but did not steal the beauty.  DSCN8304.jpgAlthough I love this sculpture, I’m always disappointed, someone did not have the foresight to position this in a better place.  No matter which way you photograph it, there is always something that should not be in the background.  Beauty, misplaced.DSCN8320.jpgBut not at Woody Lake.  I found a wild clematis (I think) vine starting its journey across shrubs.  Yes, spring!DSCN8322.jpgAnd among the grass, scores of tiny yellow rumped thornbill, too quick, except for one.

I learned during this trip.  I’ve become accustomed to the mindfulness moments.  My body and mind needs this to function effectively.

And when I’m home, reflecting on these moments, does the same for me.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

 

 

Inflight angel

She is slender with skin like ebony, smooth and dark.  Her eye lashes are naturally long and curled.  Her long hair is captive in a netted chignon.  Her bilingual skills are evident in her faint French accent each time she says, “attentsheeon”.  In a noisy plane, I watch her lean closer to the elderly man and say, “Monsieur, would you like some coffee?  Tea?”  Her sparkling teeth framed in a smile, floods the small plane with light.  He beams back at her.  “Tea, thanks, love”, he responds happily.  Her light, her aura, is generous.  We all share this during a short flight.

The small plane shook and rattled.  We are flying into a very strong headwind, punching through big angry clouds.  I catch her eye, me from the back, and she in the front.  She smiles.  I, do, too.  Secretly, we both know, we are serene as ducks on a pond, each hiding the anxiety that wells inside.  We laugh nervously when saying goodbye.  No more words needed.  We are safe.

I’ve taught myself to be less anxious on these flights.  I focus on taking photographs or visualize my return home.

These are some of the pictures I keep in memory ….DSCN7519.jpgA musk duck trying to look cool while expelling a blast of bubbles when attempting to attract a mate!thumb_IMG_3282_1024.jpgPerth Airport, just before I flew out the other day.  thumb_IMG_3310_1024.jpgI’ve come to know the Midwest is gorgeous in winter.  This hill is on approach to Geraldton.thumb_IMG_3308_1024.jpgIf you wake early enough, you’ll find frost on desert flowers in the mining region.thumb_IMG_3276_1024.jpgAnd when I return home, it’s time to stop and smell the roses.thumb_IMG_3273_1024.jpg

No medication can match the effectiveness of these strategies, for me.

Part of the journey was letting go of what I knew and stepping into the unknown.  I found it was not a bad place to be!

I’m no longer a nervous traveller.  A stormy sky no longer makes me anxious.  I’ve learned to trust.  It is as big a step, as learning to forgive.  I found when you do, you give yourself an amazing gift.

You start to live.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

Awakened

“Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes” is a quote by Carl Jung that resonates with me.

As I wrote in the previous post, as a child I merely looked through a window at a world that was and may have been.  I did not really experience it.  I do now.

While bush walking there is much to see, hear, smell, taste and touch.  It makes one alert to the sensory experience of being in the natural world.

Although this is big country with magnificent landscape, I’ve learnt to look for small things too.  So I’ll share some with you.DSCN8230.jpgI found a cluster of bell-like gum nuts at my feet.  Although they will not bloom like other similar blossoms, their beauty is more accessible, close up.  This is how it is meant to be, for some.DSCN8169.jpgI look for solitary things in nature.  Things that should belong together, but somehow fall away.  Their beauty is undiminished, in isolation.  For some, it takes effort to believe in this but when they do, the rewards are endless.DSCN8252.jpgI prefer not to touch an object before I photograph it.  I feel I need to respect the space where the object has come to rest.  It was there for a reason.  Things happen for a reason.  It is something I’ve come to respect about life, too.DSCN8243During this walk, I followed a trail of clover.  It was a delicate wreath that wound itself around a massive rock.  The dichotomy of strength and fragility, written in simple lines.  And, yes, they can co-exist, each not detracting beauty from the other.DSCN8233.jpgI know now, even green leaves fall away and come to rest until they disintegrate in the wind.  This is their journey, not mine.  The moment shared was finite.  So is life.DSCN8232.jpgSome are plain, beige, but sparkle best, when it rains.  I’ve come to learn some people rise to their adversity, and can land softly, among rocks.DSCN8076.jpgSome fade with a kaleidoscope explosion of colour.  The message is clear.  I was here once.DSCN8253.jpgWhile others, are golden, among green.  They signal season.  A time for everything, and everything, in time.

This is my time.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

 

The sky, a canvas

Clouds infer different meanings.  For me, they bring joy.  They represent drama and art in the sky, and sometimes, I find clouds just above ground.

DSCN7279.jpgSunrise, Esperance Bay, Western Australiathumb_IMG_0249_1024.jpgSunset, The Fascine, Carnarvon, Western Australiadscn5487Full moon, Wheatbelt, Western Australia

DSCN9861.JPGA cloud of little corellas, home, Western Australia

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird