Say it with flowers

I love fresh flowers.  Sadly, with frequent travel it is a luxury I cannot indulge in.  I do return home from each trip to a front garden full of roses.  They seem to bloom profusely, partly because I have given my neighbours permission to cut as many as they like for themselves.  It’s a win-win situation.

Last week a bunch of flowers was also a white flag to irate neighbours who I hadn’t met before and much to their frustration could not contact me when the fence blew down.

When my son was about five, the neighbour who lived across the road from us lost her husband to cancer.  My son promptly stated he wanted to give her flowers.  I cut some iceberg roses and placed them in a laundry basket as I snipped at the bushes, thinking I’d keep some for myself and do up a bunch for her.  No!  My son insisted, she was to have all of them.  The image of a five year old child staggering across our front yard to her home, laundry basket filled with white iceberg roses, is a precious memory.

My recent memories are embedded in flowers.  I’ve found in this State something is always blooming somewhere.

Oh!  the irony of living in a happy place and not knowing it!DSCN8938.jpgThis morning I walked around in Foxes Lair.  There were so many flowers to see and enjoy.  It was overwhelming. DSCN8963.jpgThe long view was beautiful.  But what was at my feet?DSCN8911.jpgI found this straggly plant, probably a weed.  Just green foliage but wait, there was a hint of colour.  It is imperceptible even now when I look for it.DSCN8883.jpgI waited for the sunrise and returned to the plant.DSCN8870.jpgI’m not sure if it is a weed or not but it lifted my flagging spirits.DSCN8757.jpgThe tea tree flowers were growing everywhere, sprayed here and there, over leaf debris.DSCN8832.jpgThen there was this gorgeous plant.  Exquisite.DSCN8897.jpgThis enamel orchid took my breath away.  I’ve never seen one this tiny.DSCN8852.jpgI looked deep into tiny flowers.  Each perfect in creation.DSCN8939.jpgThis trigger plant was a stronger pink compared to those that were in the palest pink hues.DSCN8956.jpgA gorgeous succulent.DSCN8944.jpgThere were all shades of purple.  This one so vivid against grey debris.

I walked around Foxes Lair this morning, listening to the crunch of my boots on dirt and dried leaves, the twittering of birds, the intermittent cacophony of kookaburras, the shower of gum nuts from above.

I know one thing for sure.  I can’t wait to return.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

Spring in the South-West

Although they grow profusely everywhere you look, there are two regions in Western Australian synonymous with wildflowers at springtime, the South West and the Midwest.

This time in the South West I went looking for flowers in new places.  New for me.  They were always there.  DSCN8239.jpgI stopped by Minninup Pool, just outside Collie.  DSCN8133.jpgHow many shades of yellow can one find?  DSCN8278.jpgI had heard the underside of the blue enamel orchid is beautiful.  It is.DSCN8298.jpgIn nature, when differences come together, it creates nothing but spectacular beauty.  DSCN8314.jpgA wild orchid.DSCN8328.jpgA bottlebrush waiting to bloom.DSCN8396I found hundreds of these white and pink lily like flowers in Margaret River.DSCN8399.jpgThe flowers were growing on stalks a few feet high.DSCN8402.jpgAnd these poms of white found a place in wooded areas too.

I’m off again in a few hours, this time to the Midwest.  I’m hoping I’m not too late for the flowers there.

Will be back with more to share with you.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

 

Colour, my world

I’m no gardener, but I’m forever thinking about my garden.  I now live in a house where I have planned different types of gardens in small isolated pockets.  My vision is yet to come to fruition, but thinking about this, is a happy place to be.

When I was married my husband and I were constantly at odds with how the garden should look.  Forward thinking for the time, he was insistent on a garden with native trees and shrubs as they are plants that require little maintenance and water.  I, on the other hand, wanted an English garden with lavender, roses, geraniums, hydrangeas, and cottage plants.  He indulged my love for this to a point.  When my marriage ended I had a hedge of 14 white iceberg roses that bloomed incessantly with thousands of flowers.  Far from being a reminder of him, they served to remind me he had worked hard outdoors so I could enjoy the view.  It was a memory worth keeping so I continued to keep it alive with more flowers.  The only time I can remember gardening, is when I decided to turn the upper level into a white garden and that space had only white flowers of all kinds.  I wish I had taken pictures.  It was beautiful.  I looked forward to my alone times in the white garden.  I shed all my other roles when I was here except one, student.  On reflection, it was a space where I gave my body breath each day and where I created a new life.

I moved from that space, in more ways than one and found a world of colour.  I was fortunate to find this in a lifestyle that meets all my needs.  Each day I work towards that life, one that strengthens the core of me.  I make sure I stop each day for a few minutes.  I now see colour and detail.  DSCN8425.jpgYellow everlasting flowers growing roadside in the Wheatbelt.DSCN8431.jpgor growing side by side with blue leschenaultia in dry, gravel soil.DSCN8432.jpgThe beautiful velvety native purple flowers on grey foliage that look extremely ordinary from a distance.  But close up?  You be the judge.DSCN8438.jpgThese interesting flowers are tiny and waxy.  I’ve seen creamy lemon ones in the Goldfields.  They glisten in the sun like dew.  Up close, they are delicate and finely veined, like aged hands.  I’ve seen hundreds and thousands of these, but this time, I saw one in bloom.  Exquisite.DSCN8455.jpgThen there are the tiny everlastings that glow like embers, along the ground.DSCN8464.jpgThe beautiful spears of grevillea that grow wild everywhere.DSCN8469.jpgOr these mops of orange.DSCN8476.jpgand blue.DSCN8478.jpgThe delicate intricacy of the cone flower.DSCN8483.jpgAnd tiny, tiny, butter yellow blooms.DSCN8454.jpgI still find white flowers joyful.

 

They remind me how far I’ve come.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

Ballerinas, in the bush

I had never thought to look for wild orchids in Helms Arboretum, Esperance.  I usually park here for a few minutes when I visit the town to enjoy the parrots in the tall gum trees and to catch a few minutes alone.  But having read a blog recommended by Tracy (Reflections of an Untidy Mind), I walked around instead of staying in my car.

Wild orchids love debris of leaves and fallen logs.  So do snakes.  Dugites look like fallen twigs.  They are deadly and agile.  Spring time is their time.  Maybe that explains why I have never walked around here before.  But I was prepared this time for bush walking and dressed in my best protective gear.  I stepped off the plane to here.

DSCN7548.jpgTo the novice, this is just rubble.  Not me.  My heart raced as I walked around.  I anticipated seeing some wild orchids, just as the blog had published.DSCN7108.jpgSoon I found the first orchids.  DSCN7303.jpgTiny bulbs.  I had never seen orchid bulbs before.DSCN7305.jpgThe donkey orchids bloomed, stained like tortoise shells, in their hundreds.DSCN7279.jpgAmong the grass there were spider orchids.DSCN7269.jpgOh! so graceful in bud!DSCN7268.jpgWhen blooming, they danced around, ta da ing their way across grass and rubble.DSCN7275.jpgTheir heart, exquisite.DSCN7124.jpgSome bloomed in trios, each more graceful than their neighbour, in still posture.DSCN7337.jpgI headed over to the Lookout where there is a steep gradient over granite rock to bush land below.  I’ve found white sugar orchids here before, so I went looking.  I wasn’t disappointed!DSCN7549.jpgThere were some that were stronger in colour.  Each detail so perfect in dusk light.DSCN7355.jpgOthers, tinted white.DSCN7360.jpgAnd others, deep in the bush, barely pink.

I have no other words to describe these orchids, other than ballerinas, because they dance so gracefully, in the breeze.

They lit up my heart, eyes and mind.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

PS Thank you Tracy!

 

 

 

 

Nature’s oeuvre 1/2

Focused on getting to my destination in failing light and blinding rain I failed to see the world around me.  How often do we do this?  I know I did this more than I should have in the past two days.  Had I not reminded myself to live more mindfully, I would have missed a lot more.

It is officially spring in the Southern Hemisphere, in two days.  There’s so much to look forward to especially after I discovered the joys of wildflowers.  How did I live in ‘The Wildflower State’ for decades and not notice the beauty that recurs each year, unfailingly?

The ebb and flow of Nature’s oeuvre, is to be enjoyed moment to moment and not season to season.  I have learnt to put brakes on, slow down and live in the here and now.  Foxes Lair has taught me, flowers bloom, when it is their time.  DSCN9641.jpgFifty kilometers from town, I noticed the sun was setting to my left and a huge moon rose from behind a grove of trees on my right.  Startled by the silent luminosity, I had to stop to take a picture.  The presence of it in the sky calmed my spirit.  There was benevolence in the light.  The only motorist on the road, I slowed down, no longer alone in poor weather.DSCN9855.jpgNext morning I walked around the reserve.  I’m usually alone here so I claim this as mine each time I visit!  Winter has left it lush with bright yellow daubes of acacia everywhere.DSCN9680.jpgA closer look at the spikes of flowers is worth the moment of quiet.DSCN9763.jpgI stood in a ‘forest’ of banksia.  These ones are quite different to anything I’ve seen elsewhere.DSCN9764.jpgThey are a beautiful tumeric colour with the tip, dipped in white.  A ‘ta da’ moment comes to mind!DSCN9813.jpgI’ve learned to look at my footsteps.  No longer afraid of snakes (although I’m still snake aware), I’ve learnt to read the footprints of others.  Parrots!  So I look up.DSCN9895This must have been a young one trying his best to make ‘parrot calls’, and not quite getting there.  Yet!DSCN9653.jpgThe clumps of hibbertia are everywhere.  They are bright in debris that gathers at the base of the gum trees.DSCN9881.jpgI love this hakea that grows like giant kebabs with flowers blooming intermittently between spiky, sharp leaves.

I’m time poor today and will try and complete this before I head out again.

Until then

As always

a dawn bird

 

Here comes spring … maybe

I’ve just returned from Moora, a small Wheatbelt town about 200 kms from home.

The Wheatbelt area is renowned for wildflowers.  They have started to bloom.  There’s a small bush reserve just outside Moora, Candy Bush Reserve, that I’ve always wanted to visit.  I’ve never been brave enough to walk through on my own as it is on the outskirts of town and isolated.  But today I did.  I saw a group of people walking through and I saw my chance.  I parked my car and changed into my bush walking shoes and trailed behind them.

In spring there are carpets of paper everlastings in this area.  People come from far and wide to see this.DSCN9602.jpgBut I love to find the solitary one, like this one, pale ice cream pink.DSCN9612Some so tiny, they make sand and pebbles seem large.DSCN9603.jpgI love the incongruity of delicate flowers growing among thicket.DSCN9613.jpgWhile huge sprawling bushes have prongs of flowers that reach out.DSCN9616.jpgI’m not sure what these were, but they were striking among the greenery.

 

DSCN9617.jpgThere were swatches of these yellow flowers but it’s easy to see why these two caught my eye.DSCN9623.jpgI stopped my car on the way home for one last picture of the fields of fluro yellow canola that splashed colour, as far as the eye could see.

I’ve been home for a couple of hours.  All these images seem so far away.  They were taken today!

It’s night as I write this.  Thunder is rumbling above me.  The rain is thumping as it hits the roof of the shed.

So you can see why I’m reticent to say, here comes spring.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

 

Finding spring

It is Friday night.  A winter’s night.  Rain is lashing outside with the intermittent hiss and spray of hail.  I’m rugged up but still cold, so I had a novel thought.  I’ll conjure up spring.

My colleague from the north sent me an email today.  “Bring your camera”, she said, “the flowers are out”.  I can’t wait to see them!  I know what a feast for the eyes wildflowers can be here in spring.  I had a glimpse of this last week when I was north, so I’ll share them with you while it rains.DSCN8552.jpgThese tiny everlastings were flowers within flowers.  Thousands of these roadside.DSCN8510.jpgI thought they were exquisite.DSCN8507.jpgThis was a tiny flower.  The sand gives some perspective to the size.DSCN8487.jpgThen there were succulents.DSCN8506.jpgWere these past their prime?  Still beautiful, I thought.DSCN8501.jpgAnd carpets of these succulents, too, along the sand hills, ocean side.DSCN8483The wattle has a distinctive perfume.  Like, honey.DSCN8496.jpgVivid colours in harsh country.DSCN8512.jpgThere were thousands of these along the coast too.DSCN8468.jpgThis was one of my favourites.  There were carpets of these, yes, acres of flowers, but this one caught my eye.  It seemed to support a whole colony.

When driving these flowers look like splashes and spills of colours in an otherwise beige landscape.  I’ve found it pays to stop and look closer.  I’m glad I did, because with the din of a wild winter outside, I’m able to share with you my spring.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird