Spring in the South-West

Although they grow profusely everywhere you look, there are two regions in Western Australian synonymous with wildflowers at springtime, the South West and the Midwest.

This time in the South West I went looking for flowers in new places.  New for me.  They were always there.  DSCN8239.jpgI stopped by Minninup Pool, just outside Collie.  DSCN8133.jpgHow many shades of yellow can one find?  DSCN8278.jpgI had heard the underside of the blue enamel orchid is beautiful.  It is.DSCN8298.jpgIn nature, when differences come together, it creates nothing but spectacular beauty.  DSCN8314.jpgA wild orchid.DSCN8328.jpgA bottlebrush waiting to bloom.DSCN8396I found hundreds of these white and pink lily like flowers in Margaret River.DSCN8399.jpgThe flowers were growing on stalks a few feet high.DSCN8402.jpgAnd these poms of white found a place in wooded areas too.

I’m off again in a few hours, this time to the Midwest.  I’m hoping I’m not too late for the flowers there.

Will be back with more to share with you.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

 

Ballerinas, in the bush

I had never thought to look for wild orchids in Helms Arboretum, Esperance.  I usually park here for a few minutes when I visit the town to enjoy the parrots in the tall gum trees and to catch a few minutes alone.  But having read a blog recommended by Tracy (Reflections of an Untidy Mind), I walked around instead of staying in my car.

Wild orchids love debris of leaves and fallen logs.  So do snakes.  Dugites look like fallen twigs.  They are deadly and agile.  Spring time is their time.  Maybe that explains why I have never walked around here before.  But I was prepared this time for bush walking and dressed in my best protective gear.  I stepped off the plane to here.

DSCN7548.jpgTo the novice, this is just rubble.  Not me.  My heart raced as I walked around.  I anticipated seeing some wild orchids, just as the blog had published.DSCN7108.jpgSoon I found the first orchids.  DSCN7303.jpgTiny bulbs.  I had never seen orchid bulbs before.DSCN7305.jpgThe donkey orchids bloomed, stained like tortoise shells, in their hundreds.DSCN7279.jpgAmong the grass there were spider orchids.DSCN7269.jpgOh! so graceful in bud!DSCN7268.jpgWhen blooming, they danced around, ta da ing their way across grass and rubble.DSCN7275.jpgTheir heart, exquisite.DSCN7124.jpgSome bloomed in trios, each more graceful than their neighbour, in still posture.DSCN7337.jpgI headed over to the Lookout where there is a steep gradient over granite rock to bush land below.  I’ve found white sugar orchids here before, so I went looking.  I wasn’t disappointed!DSCN7549.jpgThere were some that were stronger in colour.  Each detail so perfect in dusk light.DSCN7355.jpgOthers, tinted white.DSCN7360.jpgAnd others, deep in the bush, barely pink.

I have no other words to describe these orchids, other than ballerinas, because they dance so gracefully, in the breeze.

They lit up my heart, eyes and mind.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

PS Thank you Tracy!

 

 

 

 

In spring, my steps are slow

Yesterday I spent the first three early hours of the day in Foxes Lair in Narrogin.  I barely walked two kilometers as there was so much to see.DSCN9972.jpgThe Lair was a florist shop.  There are thousands of flowers and different species every few steps.  Instead of rubber necking, I decided to explore one side of the track before exploring the other.   I also decided to look for the smaller flowers that the eye can barely see.DSCN9998.jpgI found tiny purple tassle flowers.DSCN9949.jpgBlue lechenaultia blooming in some corners.DSCN7060.jpgWhile others responded more slowly to sunlight.  Blue and purple flowers are more difficult to see in dense bushland where white, pink and yellow are dominant colours in spring.DSCN7079.jpgI spent a lot of time with the exquisitely tiny paper everlasting flowers.  They are barely visible to the naked eye.DSCN7090.jpgThey love the sun and open at first rays before one’s eyes.DSCN7092.jpgHow cute is this?DSCN7089I loved the white flowers too, interspersed among the pinks.DSCN9992The tiny pink fairy orchids were scattered here and there.DSCN7084.jpgThe sundew were less frequently seen this month.  I love these flowers.DSCN9953.jpgThe hakea tassle flowers were frosting large bushes, white with pink tips.DSCN9990.jpgI found this beautiful white orchid, demurely blooming behind a log.DSCN7029.jpgI thought this was moss but it looks like a succulent of some kind.DSCN9979.jpgThis was the only pimelea I found during my walk.  Beautiful!DSCN7036.jpgI heard a squawk above my head, only to find a young redcap parrot, all ruffled to greet the day.DSCN7056.jpgWhile another young parrot groomed nearby.DSCN7051.jpgOn the ground, the red breasted robin kept me company.

I’m now off to the Great Southern region and when I return, I hope to have, more of the same.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

 

 

Here comes spring … maybe

I’ve just returned from Moora, a small Wheatbelt town about 200 kms from home.

The Wheatbelt area is renowned for wildflowers.  They have started to bloom.  There’s a small bush reserve just outside Moora, Candy Bush Reserve, that I’ve always wanted to visit.  I’ve never been brave enough to walk through on my own as it is on the outskirts of town and isolated.  But today I did.  I saw a group of people walking through and I saw my chance.  I parked my car and changed into my bush walking shoes and trailed behind them.

In spring there are carpets of paper everlastings in this area.  People come from far and wide to see this.DSCN9602.jpgBut I love to find the solitary one, like this one, pale ice cream pink.DSCN9612Some so tiny, they make sand and pebbles seem large.DSCN9603.jpgI love the incongruity of delicate flowers growing among thicket.DSCN9613.jpgWhile huge sprawling bushes have prongs of flowers that reach out.DSCN9616.jpgI’m not sure what these were, but they were striking among the greenery.

 

DSCN9617.jpgThere were swatches of these yellow flowers but it’s easy to see why these two caught my eye.DSCN9623.jpgI stopped my car on the way home for one last picture of the fields of fluro yellow canola that splashed colour, as far as the eye could see.

I’ve been home for a couple of hours.  All these images seem so far away.  They were taken today!

It’s night as I write this.  Thunder is rumbling above me.  The rain is thumping as it hits the roof of the shed.

So you can see why I’m reticent to say, here comes spring.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

 

Generous Earth

It’s three weeks before spring.  Like me, it feels like the Earth is anticipating this too.  I feel like as joyous as a child on a spiral staircase, slipping and sliding and at times, careening, giddy with delight.  I have planned three short breaks during early spring.  I can hardly wait!  As I countdown …thumb_IMG_3399_1024The canola fields are turning gold in the farming Midwest.DSCN8746.jpgThis picture captures the colours of the Midwest, so perfectly, from the ground.  DSCN8743.jpgThere are expanses of these low growing shrubs, encrusted with tiny flowers growing in the bush.DSCN8772.jpgBeautiful spears of flowers everywhere one looks.  DSCN8775.jpgIn this land even a common weed looks beautiful!thumb_IMG_3413_1024.jpgThere are huge swatches of paper everlasting flowers.  Just breathtaking!thumb_IMG_3418_1024.jpgSeeing them up close, is seeing perfection.DSCN8766.jpgThese purple flowers are scattered among the pinks and whites.thumb_IMG_3422_1024.jpgIn my garden the bees are busy.IMG_3356.jpgAnd, roses continue to bloom.

The Earth is generous at this time of year, so I thought I’d share my bounty with you.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird

 

Finding spring

It is Friday night.  A winter’s night.  Rain is lashing outside with the intermittent hiss and spray of hail.  I’m rugged up but still cold, so I had a novel thought.  I’ll conjure up spring.

My colleague from the north sent me an email today.  “Bring your camera”, she said, “the flowers are out”.  I can’t wait to see them!  I know what a feast for the eyes wildflowers can be here in spring.  I had a glimpse of this last week when I was north, so I’ll share them with you while it rains.DSCN8552.jpgThese tiny everlastings were flowers within flowers.  Thousands of these roadside.DSCN8510.jpgI thought they were exquisite.DSCN8507.jpgThis was a tiny flower.  The sand gives some perspective to the size.DSCN8487.jpgThen there were succulents.DSCN8506.jpgWere these past their prime?  Still beautiful, I thought.DSCN8501.jpgAnd carpets of these succulents, too, along the sand hills, ocean side.DSCN8483The wattle has a distinctive perfume.  Like, honey.DSCN8496.jpgVivid colours in harsh country.DSCN8512.jpgThere were thousands of these along the coast too.DSCN8468.jpgThis was one of my favourites.  There were carpets of these, yes, acres of flowers, but this one caught my eye.  It seemed to support a whole colony.

When driving these flowers look like splashes and spills of colours in an otherwise beige landscape.  I’ve found it pays to stop and look closer.  I’m glad I did, because with the din of a wild winter outside, I’m able to share with you my spring.

Until next time

As always

a dawn bird